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REBECCA IN THOUGHTS AND WORDS

AMERICAN INDIAN POEMS AND QUOTES
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"It ended...
His body changed to light,
A star that burns forever in the sky."

Aztec-American Indian

Indian Blessing
Let us walk softly on the Earth
with all living beings great and small
remembering as we go, that one God
kind and wise created all.

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An Indian Prayer

O' Great Spirit
Whose voice I hear in the winds
And whose breath gives life to all the world
Hear me! I am small and weak, I need your
strength and wisdom

Let me walk in beauty, and make my eyes
ever behold the red and purple sunset

Make my hands respect the things you have
made and my ears sharp to hear your voice

Make me wise so that I may understand the
things you have taught my people

Let me learn the lessons you have hidden
in every leaf and rock

I seek strength, not to be greater than my
brother, but to fight my greatest enemy-myself

Make me always ready to come to you with
clean hands and straight eyes

So when life fades, as the fading sunset
my spirit may come to you
without shame

This prayer is from the Sioux Indian children of Red Cloud Indian School

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MY AMERICAN INDIAN POEMS!!!
 
BURY ME AT WOUNDED KNEE
 
Bury me at wounded knee,
for my heart grows faint and my body grows old.
The grounds too soft for my feet to tread,
and the nights are cold; too cold.
 
Bury me at wounded knee,
where the warriors died young and bold.
The white man comes to steal our land,
for the gold; pure gold.
 
Bury me at wounded knee,
for we won't do as we're told.
The women die from lack of food,
and our children are sold; all sold.
 
And soon our footprints in the snow,
will blow away with the wind.
And only silence lingers on,
where once laughter had been!
 
ODE OF THE LOST INDIAN NATION
 
You came to our land of milk and honey fair,
and trampled through our woods, as if we were not there.
You ignored all our pleas for peace, and marched us to and fro,
and now we are scattered here and there with no place else to go.
 
You beat us like dogs, and expect us to bow down,
you made us hungry and weak, til we fall to the ground.
You took our daughters for wives,  and made our nation weak,
you made cowards out of most, and now we are afraid to speak.
 
So now I humbly ask you, was it worth the fight,
to scourge our village, and raid us through the night?
You thinned out our bloodlines; you thought you were smart,
you may take the Indian from our blood, but never from our heart.
 
 
THE VOICE OF THE INDIAN NATION
 
They came with picks and axes and guns in tow,
and told the Indian Nation, you will have to go.
They cared little about nature, and less for the land,
now left with no place to go, we must make our stand.
 
They let us starve in winter, and put many warriors to rest.
They walk around like kings of the earth; like they're the only blest.
But now I say to the white man, conquers of old and new,
many diasterous events, will soon come to you!
 
Because God, our might creator, and his blessed son,
will not let you trample mother earth, and walk as if you have won.
So come on brothers and sisters, lets dance and sing our song,
and come together once again, and make our nation strong!
 
 
A WARRIOR'S CONFESSION TO HIS FAIR MAIDEN
 
Oh, my love how fair you are.
You are brighter than a night time star.
The wind sweeps your silky raven hair,
your eyes like drops of amber rare.
 
We climb upon a mountain high,
and watch the sunset in the sky.
Together we watch the stars above,
vowing our eternal love.
 
 
WHITE BUFFALO CALF WOMAN
 
Many natives speak of her, she came from up above.
She came upon the earth, to unite the rainbow love.
She came as a white calf, but it soon was clear to see,
that she was so much more, than a mystery.
 
So long ago she came, and spoke of brotherhood.
And sent each one their separate ways, to live a life of good.
So when you see a white calf, born pure and true,
remember to unite in love, for she is watching you!
 
 
SOULS OF YESTERDAY
 
They still walk the plains, when the moon is high.
Their ghostly figures upon their horse, as they go riding by.
The wolves upon a high rock, with their frosted breath of air,
look out upon the poor souls, with their amber stare.
 
The cold plains full of snow, the weary band draws near,
silent is the night, but for the wailing cries you here.
Marching onward they go, moving far away,
soon they disappear; the souls of yesterday.
 
 
THE MEDICINE MAN (CALL OF THE WOLF)
 
On a cold moonlit night, with snow upon the ground,
majestic mountains standing tall, where no soul is found,
only the medicine man, with his palette round.
 
In the distance, a hooting owl, as he takes to flight,
or the faint bobcat growl, as he vanishes from sight,
then silence, as the medicine man chants long into the night.
 
Suddenly a heart-felt cry; a wolf stands by the tree,
with his amber soulful eyes, appearing magically,
like a spirit, roaming wild and free.
 
 
THE WAY THINGS WERE
 
Once upon a time there was a free land,
beauty rested upon it everywhere. There
were rivers of fresh clear water, where
Bears of every kind would fish and play.
There were Wolves with their mystic howl,
telling of ancient times and singing to the
moon. The trees would talk and whisper,
laughing with every breeze. The flowers in
the meadow lands were happy to peek their
heads to each fresh new day. And they would
be star struck every night with the moon's gentle
bright glow! The Buffalo would graze in the meadow
and laze around on a sunny day and listen to the songs
of the Meadow Lark as he happily cut across the grass
lands. The rains had their time to pour and the fruits and
nuts of every kind would grow. It was a vast and beautiful
place, where harmony abound. The ancient people there
would give thanks and prayers for their bountiful harvest.
They payed homage to all of nature just taking where they
should and leaving where they could. Nothing out of place.
The kids would play in the fields and leap with the gentle
Deer. For there wasn't yet that kind of fear between these
people and their brothers and sisters in nature. All of nature
had a gift and a message to send. From the wise old owl, the
snake that slithered along to every rock, tree and blade of grass.
Their ceremonies would make all the woodland creatures in awe.
Hearing the gentle yet deep beat of the drum to the chanting and
dancing of the two-legged kind. Then in the breath of time there
were those that came. They didn't pay homage to nature, they
polluted her rivers and creeks. They killed more of the four-legged
than was necessary and sometimes they did it just because.
Nature didn't understand and so she reacted by giving stings to
the Insects and Scorpions. And killer instincts to the four-legged
to surrive. She gave droughts and sometimes downpours when it
should not be. She wanted to gently scold. But they didn't listen.
Then things changed and fear was begotten into this beautiful land.
Beauty still exists within her. You just have to dig deeper to find it!
We must never give up hope and always love and remember in the
far reaches of our hearts, the way things were....And only can we
change it back again!
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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                                AMERICAN INDIAN QUOTES:
 
 
When the white man discovered this
country Indians were running it.
No taxes no debt, women did all the work
White man thought he could improve on a system like this.
Old Cherokee Saying

~~~~~~
We, the great mass of the people think only of the
love we have for our land, we do love the land
where we were brought up. We will never let our hold
to this land go, to let it go it will be like throwing
away (our) mother that gave (us) birth.
Letter from Aitooweyah to John Ross,
Principal Chief of the Cherokees.

~~~~~~
Grown men can learn from very little children
for the hearts of the little children are pure.
Therefore, the Great Spirit may show to them
many things which older people miss.
Black Elk

~~~~~~
A very great vision is needed and the man
who has it must follow it as the eagle seeks
the deepest blue of the sky.
Crazy Horse

~~~~~~
I am tired of fighting...from where the sun now stands,
I will fight no more.
Chief Joseph

~~~~~~
The Great Spirit Chief who rules above all
will smile upon this land...
and this time the Indian race is waiting and praying.
Chief Joseph

~~~~~~
Treat the earth well,
It was not given to you by your parents,
It was loaned to you by your children.
Indian Proverb

~~~~~~
All things share the same breath - the beast, the tree,
the man, the air shares its spirit with all the life it supports.
Chief Seattle

~~~~~~
When a white army battles Indians and wins, it
is called a great victory, but if they lose it
is called a massacre.
Chiksika, Shawnee

~~~~~~
We are now about to take our leave and kind farewell to
our native land, the country the Great Spirit gave our
Fathers, we are on the eve of leaving that country that
gave us birth, it is with sorrow we are forced by the
white man to quit the scenes of our childhood...we bid
farewell to it and all we hold dear.
Charles Hicks, Tsalagi (Cherokee) Vice Chief
speaking of The Trail of Tears, Nov. 4, 1838
 
Conversation was never begun at once, nor in a hurried manner. No one was quick with a question, no matter how important, and no one was pressed for an answer. A pause giving time for thought was the truly courteous way of beginning and conducting a conversation. Silence was meaningful with the Lakota, and his granting a space of silence to the speech-maker and his own moment of silence before talking was done in the practice of true politeness and regard for the rule that "thought comes before speech." 

Luther Standing Bear, Oglala Sioux Chief

It is the general belief of the Indians that after a man dies his spirit is somewhere on the earth or in the sky, we do not know exactly where, but we are sure that his spirit still lives. . . . So it is with Wakantanka. We believe that he is everywhere, yet he is to us as the spirits of our friends, whose voices we can not hear. 

 Chased-by-Bears, Santee-Yanktonai Sioux

 

A warrior who had more than he needed would make a feast. He went around and invited the old and needy. . . The man who could thank the food—some worthy old medicine man or warrior—said, ". . . . look to the old, they are worthy of old age; they have seen their days and proven themselves. With the help of the Great Spirit, they have attained a ripe old age. At this age the old can predict or give knowledge or wisdom, whatever it is; it is so. At the end is a cane. You and your family shall get to where the cane is." 

 Black Elk, Oglala Sioux holy man

Time discovered truth. 

Seneca

"When you were born, you cried and the world rejoiced.
 Live your life so that when you die, the world cries and you rejoice."

Cherokee Expression

Trouble no more about their religion;
respect others in their view, 
and demand that they respect yours.

Chief Tecumseh



Man has responsibility, not power.

Native American Proverb (Tuscarora).



"One does not sell the land people walk on." ... 

Crazy Horse, Sept. 23, 1875


Why not teach school children more of the wholesome proverbs and legends of our people?  That we killed game only for food, not for fun... Tell your children of the friendly acts of the Indians to the white people who first settled here.  Tell them of our leaders and heroes and their deeds... Put in your history books the Indian's part in the World War. Tell how the Indian fought for a country of which he was not a citizen, for a flag to which he had no claim, and for a people who treated him unjustly.  We ask this, Chief, to keep sacred the memory of our people. 

     Grand Council Fire of American Indians to the Mayor of Chicago, 1927


An American Indian elder described his own inner struggles this way: "Inside of me there two dogs. One of the dogs is mean and evil. The other dog is good. The mean dog fights the good dog all the time." When asked which dog wins, he reflected for a moment and replied, "The one I feed the most."  

Unknown



.  . everything on the earth has a purpose, every disease an herb to cure it, and every person a mission. This is the Indian theory of existence. 

Mourning Dove (Christine Quintasket), Salish



Humankind has not woven the web of life. We are but one thread within it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves. All things are bound together. All things connect.

 Chief Seattle 

There is no death. Only a change of worlds. 

Chief Seattle
 

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VOTE FOR AN NATIVE AMERICAN HOLIDAY
 
 
 
 
 "Silence,they say,is the voice of complicity. But silence is impossible. Silence screams. Silence is the message,just as doing nothing is an act. Let who you are ring out and resonate in every word and deed. Yes,become who you are. There's no sidestepping your own being or your own responsibility. What you do is who you are. You are your own comeuppance. You become your own message. You are the message. In the Spirit of Crazy Horse." 
 Leonard Peltier~ U.S. Federal Prisoner #89637-132 

"A thing of beauty is a joy forever: Its loveliness increases; it will never pass into nothingness; but still will keep a bower quiet for us, and a sleep full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing."--John Keats