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REBECCA IN THOUGHTS AND WORDS

EVERYTHING HERBS
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A PLACE FOR GARDENERS AND HERBAVORES ALIKE!!!
If you got one to add please write me rebeccawiles2007@gmail.com  and let me know and I will gladly add it!

                                        HERB LORE
                             
ALOE: Due to its ability to survive where other plants do not it is regarded as a healing plant. It is good for spells that are to sustain the body or to dispel discomfort.

BAMBOO:
Bamboo is an extremely versatile plant and has many uses, it represents growth and versatility.

BAYBERRY:
Symbolizes illusions and appearances, it is used for visions and divining.

BEECH:
Because of its smooth grain it was often used for writing surfaces and has come to represent ancient knowledge through objects and writings. It is often used as a replacement for oak.

BLACKBERRY:
This was considered by all to be the food of the faeries and it was extremely taboo to eat them within celtic britain.

BLOODROOT:
This herb is used to heal wounds and aid with regeneration. It symbolizes healing, strength and growth.

BLUEBELL:
These are very enchanted plants it is believed that their bells call the faeries to their midnight processions.

BONESET:
It was used to help set broken bones as well as treat wounds. It symbolizes fixing, mending, regeneration and strengthening.

BUTTERFLY WEED:
Like the butterfly it is considerd a good plant to use for healing transformation and rebirth.

CACTUS:  With its ability to store water it symbolizes hidden treasure as well as endurance and the ability to adapt to situations and environments. 

CATNIP:
Most animals either find this a powerful stimulant or a sedative, due to this seemingly contradictory effect it is used in spells for deception or paradox. 

CATTAILS:
A water growing plant that turns ponds into swamps then into dry earth this plant symbolizes strong earth energy, balance and stability. 

CEDAR:
Excellent at repelling negative energy. It is used for protection and warding away negative spirits.

CHRYSANTHEMUM:
A very decorative plant it denotes nobility and royalty. It is particularly good for speeding up the rate and flow of spells.

CLOVER:
With its three-fold leaves it was very special to the celts symbolising balance and the triad. A four leaf clover is very lucky, and it is said that wearing one within your hat will allow you to see fairies.

CORN: Corn is one of humans most treasured plants, it has always been a great source of nutrition as well as providing medicine. It is closely related to the sun, harvest, health and the earth goddess. 

CYPRESS:
This is regarded as a sad tree, as it was used to build funeral pyres it is associated with mourning.

DOGWOOD:
This tree symbolizes charm and finesse, it is used to enhance personality as well as aid in social stature.

ELM:
It is associated with shadows, darkness and depression and was used to mark off tainted areas of the countryside.

EUCALYPTUS:
It is seen as a protecting and nurturing tree. It can also symbolize 'sloth' due to its narcotic foliage.

EYEBRIGHT:
As the name suggests it has long been associated with farsight and clearness of vision. It is used for seeing faeries, the truth and farsight.

FERN:
Ferns are the favoured plant of the pixies and wherever these grow you are supposed to find them nearby. It also represents ancient knowledge and archaism.

FEVERFEW:
So called because of its ability to banish fever it is good for healing.

FIREWEED:
Fireweed is one of the first plants to grow after a fire, and it is also extremely useful providing humans with many uses. For this reason it is seen as a good plant to have as an ally.

GINSENG:
This plant concerns clarity of the mind and is used to enhance focus.

GOLDSEAL:
It is mainly used as a cleaning agent and in spells it is used to purify and cleanse.

GRASS:
This is a hardy plant that is the first to grow in most places it symbolizes food, concealment and hardiness.

HIBISCUS:
Hibiscus symbolizes beauty and fertility, its 5 petal flowers speak of protection and its random growth that of chaos. It is used for spells involving randomness, glamours and repelling negativity.

JUNIPER:
This is an excellent tree for healing and cleansing especially in curbing the spread of poisons or disease.

LARCH:
This is one of the few conifers that sheds its pines in winter. It is often used to rim ceremonial drums. It may be used for protection and inducing visions.

LILLY:
This symbolizes sorrow and is closely associated to death. It is used to symbolize danger,caution and deadly beauty.

LOTUS:
Used to symbolize intellect, mental energies and illumination. It is used to clear the mind, purify and inspire.

MANDRAKE:
With its root having the appearance of a man and it reportedly screaming when it is removed from the ground it was often used for curses and negative spells.

MAPLE:
Special for its sugar and syrup it represents success and abundance.

MISTLETOE:
Extremely sacred to the druids, when found growing on Oaks it is very magical and is a great catalyst for all spells.

MUGWORT:
This plant represents clumsiness, awkwardness and ugliness. As may be assumed this plant is used to infer these qualities onto our enemies.

MUSHROOMS: Considered to be very enchanted especially regarding faery rings. They were also used to induce visions.

MYRRH:
Myrrh symbolizes power, strength, vitality and mysticism, it can be used to increase ones energy and stamina.

NETTLE:
Though prickly it was also a great source of food, it is useful for spells that give an indication of future dangers or pitfalls.

OLEANDER:
Symbolising majestic yet deadly beauty because it is poisonous it is good for spells that involve charms, charisma and attraction.

PARSLEY:
This is a very popular herb, it represents stability and normalcy. It can be used to stabilise or ground emotions.

PENNYROYAL:
Seen as a majestic and noble plant, it is used to improve ones own status and stature.

RASPBERRY:
Often used to detect the fertility of soil it is used for spells that require detection or preserving things as its berries were used to make jam.

REED:
The reed symbolizes flexibility, rapid growth and expansion. Its stalks can also be used for making flutes. It is good for music, growth and expansion.

ROSE:
With its beautiful flowers and its deadly thorns this is another plant which symbolizes deadly beauty. It is used for glamours, enchantments and love potions.

RUE:
As the name suggests this plant governs sadness and sorrow. It is used to create depression but can also be used to help banish it.

SPRUCE:
It is a versatile tree that is a fast grower and proves dominant within its territory. Its wood is good at storing/conducting energy and it is seen as good to use when bargaining with Earth elementals. 

STRAWBERRY:
Used for love spells, its symbolism is that of love, temptation, passion and rewarded effort.

SYCAMORE:
This tree represents growth, persistance, strength and endurance.

THISTLE:
This plant is also known as Pixies' Gloves.

VERVAIN:
This plant was used to boost energy, strength and heartrates. The druids seen it as a very powerful plant using it in potions to increase the length and power of their effects.

WATERLILLY:
This plant symbolizes purity and stability in an unstable environment. It is used for spells that require purity or to invoke cultured mannerisms. 

WINTERGREEN:
Symbolizing coolness, calmness and refreshment, it is used to soothe fears and to calm the nerves.

WORMWOOD: An extremely dangerous, poisonous plant, it is sometimes used to induce visions or to harm spirits.

HERB AND GARDEN QUOTES:
 
  • "The Best Plants Come with a Story." --Maria Rodale in Organic Gardening Magazine, June/July 2006

  • “People from a planet without flowers would think we must be mad with joy the whole time to have such things about us.” --Iris Murdoch

  • "We can complain because rose bushes have thorns or rejoice because thorn bushes have roses." --Abraham Lincoln
  • "Nature has undoubtedly mastered the art of winter gardening and even the most experienced gardener can learn frm the unrestrained beauty around them." --Vincent A. Simeone, in "Wonders of the Winter Landscape

    "Occasional drama is what you want in an herbaceous border, to wake up the sleepy hordes of daisies and well-bred bellflowers." --Anna Pavord, “The New Kitchen Garden”, DK Publishing, 1996

    "In gardening, all things useful are beautiful." --Tovah Martin, “Victoria” magazine, April 1999

    "If I were to name the three most precious resources of life, I should say books, friends and nature; and the greatest of these, at least the most constant and always at hand, is nature." --Naturalist, John Burroughs

    “You need patience to be a good gardener. If you don’t have patience, and you stick with gardening, it will teach you patience.” --Bill Turull Jr. as quoted in “People, Places and Plants” magazine, N.E. / N.Y. Edition, Summer 2005

    "I appreciate the misunderstanding I have had with Nature over my perennial border. I think it is a flower garden; she thinks it is a meadow lacking grass, and tries to correct the error." --Sara Stein, “My Weeds: A Gardener's Botany” University Press of Florida, 2000

    A garden is the interface between the house and the rest of civilization. Geoffrey Charlesworth

    Wherever humans garden magnificently, there are magnificent heartbreaks. Henry Mitchell

    There is no ancient gentlemen but gardeners. William Shakespeare

    A country parson without some knowledge of plants
    is surely as incomplete as a country parsonage without a garden. Canon Henry Ellacombe (1895)

    God gave us memories that we may have roses in December. J. M. Barrie

    Men are like plants--they never grow happily unless they are well cultivated. Charles-Louis de Secondat Montesquieu (1721)

    And I beseech you, forget not to informe yourselfe
    as dilligently as may be, in things that belong to gardening. John Evelyn (1706)

    Nothing is more completely the child of Art than a Garden. Sir Walter Scott

    Fathers, instill in your children the garden-mania. Charles Joseph, Prince de Ligne (1781)

    Correct handling of flowers refines the personality. Gustie L. Herrigel

    If one were as good a gardener in practice as one is in theory, what a garden would one create! V. Sackville-West

     It is in society as in nature--not the useful, but the ornamental, that strikes the imagination. Sir Humphrey Davy (1829)

    Odd as it may appear, a gardener does not grow from seed, shoot, bulb, rhizome, or cutting,
    but from experience, surroundings, and natural conditions. Karel Capek

    We must cultivate our garden. Voltaire (1758)

    To make a great garden, one must have a great idea or a great opportunity. Sir George Sitwell

    O amateurs of gardening, be amateurs of humanity also. Charles Joseph, Prince de Ligne (1781)

    Flowers seem intended for the solace of ordinary humanity. John Ruskin

    Nature does not complete things. She is chaotic. Man must finish,
    and he does so by making a garden and building a wall. Robert Frost

    Many things grow in the garden that were never sown there. Thomas Fuller (1732)

     

    GARDEN POETRY
     

    God's Garden

    The kiss of the sun for pardon,
    The song of the birds for mirth,
    One is nearer God's heart in a garden
    Than anywhere else on earth,
    Dorothy Frances Gurney (1858-1932)

    The Green Linnet

    Beneath these fruit-tree boughs that shed
    Their snow-white blossoms on my head,
    With brightest sunshine round me spread
    Of spring's unclouded weather,
    In this sequestered nook how sweet
    To sit upon my orchard-seat!
    And birds and flowers once more to greet,
    My last year's friends together.
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850)

    The Glory of the Garden

    Oh, Adam was a gardener, and God who made him sees
    That half a proper gardener's work is done upon his knees,
    So when your work is finished, you can wash your hands and pray
    For the Glory of the Garden that it may not pass away!
    Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936)

    When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd

    In the door-yard fronting an old farm-house near the white-wash'd palings,
    Stands the lilac bush, tall-growing, with heart-shaped leaves of rich green,
    With many a pointed blossom, rising, delicate, with the perfume strong I love,
    With every leaf a miracle...and from this bush in the door-yard,
    With delicate-color'd blossoms, and heart-shaped leaves of rich green,
    A sprig, with its flower, I break.
    Walt Whitman (1819-1892)

    Thaw

    Over the land freckled with snow half-thawed
    The speculating rooks at their nests cawed
    And saw from elm-tops, delicate as flower of grass,
    What we below could not see, Winter pass.
    Edward Thomas (1878-1917)

    April

    The roofs are shining from the rain,
    The sparrows twitter as they fly,
    And with a windy April grace
    The little clouds go by.

    Yet the back yards are bare and brown
    With only one unchanging tree--
    I could not be so sure of Spring
    Save that it sings in me.
    Sara Teasdale (1884-1933)

    April Rain Song

    Let the rain kiss you.
    Let the rain beat upon your head with silver liquid drops.
    Let the rain sing you a lullaby.
    The rain makes still pools on the sidewalk.
    The rain makes running pools in the gutter.
    The rain plays a little sellp-song on our roof at night--
    And I love the rain.
    Langston Hughes (1902-1967)

    The Gardener

    The gardener in his old brown hands
    Turns over the brown earth,
    As if he loves and understands
    The flowers before their birth,
    The fragile little childish strands
    He buries in the earth.
    Like pious children one by one
    He sets them head by head,
    And draws the clothes, when all is done,
    Closely about each head,
    And leaves his children to sleep on
    In the one quiet bed.
    Arthur Symons (1865-1945)

    Violets

    Under the green hedges, after the snow,
    There do the dear little violets grow;
    Hiding their modest and beautiful heads
    Under the hawthorn in soft mossy beds.

    Sweet as the roses and blue as the sky,
    Down there do the dear little violets lie;
    Hiding their heads where they scarce may be seen,
    By the leaves you may know where the violet hath been.
    John Moultrie (1799-1874)

    Ah! Sunflower

    Ah, Sunflower! weary of time,
    Who countest the steps of the Sun;
    Seeking after that sweet golden clime,
    Where the traveler's journey is done;

    Where the Youth pined away with desire,
    And the pale Virgin shrouded in snow,
    Arise from their graves, and aspire
    Where my Sunflower wishes to go!
    William Blake (1757-1827)

    Roses

    You love the roses--so do I. I wish
    The sky would rain down roses, as they rain
    From off the shaken bush. Why will it not?
    Then all the valley would be pink and white
    And soft to tread on. They would fall as light
    As feathers, smelling sweet: and it would be
    Like sleeping and yet waking, all at once.
    George Eliot (1819-1880)

    Who Loves a Garden

    Who loves a garden
    Finds within his soul
    Life's whole;
    He hears the anthem of the soil
    While ingrates toil;
    And sees beyond his little sphere
    The waving fronds of heaven, clear.
    Louise Seymore Jones

     

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     


     
     
     





     
     
     

    VOTE FOR AN NATIVE AMERICAN HOLIDAY
     
     
     
     
     "Silence,they say,is the voice of complicity. But silence is impossible. Silence screams. Silence is the message,just as doing nothing is an act. Let who you are ring out and resonate in every word and deed. Yes,become who you are. There's no sidestepping your own being or your own responsibility. What you do is who you are. You are your own comeuppance. You become your own message. You are the message. In the Spirit of Crazy Horse." 
     Leonard Peltier~ U.S. Federal Prisoner #89637-132 

    "A thing of beauty is a joy forever: Its loveliness increases; it will never pass into nothingness; but still will keep a bower quiet for us, and a sleep full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing."--John Keats